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How to Keep Your Digestive System on Track this Passover

How to Keep Your Digestive System on Track this Passover


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If you’re looking for an excuse to jump on the gluten-, carb-, bread-, and everything else-free bandwagon, I guess Passover is your chance — but this bread-free diet comes with a price. The inescapable side effect of consuming too much Matzah…

Call it what you will —total lack-of bowel movement, a back up in the system, or just straight-up constipation — any way you put it, we can all agree: it sucks. Here are three very simple tips to help you keep kosher this Passover while avoiding discomfort and still honoring your unleavened-bread-loving ancestors.

1. Drink Water

Gratutious Gif of James Franco drinking water courtesy of Gifrific.com

Plain and simple. Get yourself a water bottle and carry it with you as if it were your child. Bowel issues are always linked to dehydration, and, as we all know, drinking water only does good things for your body. So grab a bottle and keep chugging — you’ll notice how great it feels to be hydrated.

2. Eat Fiber

Image courtesy of delicesdefleur.wordpress.com

Steer clear from non-Kosher fibrous foods like granola bars and cereal and rediscover foods with natural fiber supplements, like fresh fruits and veggies.

I suggest you do as my Jewish grandma does: make prunes tasty. Add dry prunes, sugar, and lemon juice to boiling water and let that pruney-goodness boil for 30 minutes. Trust my Bubbe on this one — she’s going on her 96th Passover.

3. Hit the Gym

Photo by Alison Weissbrot

Physical activity induces peristalsis, the bodily reaction that allows your bowels to contract so you can, ya know, go. Hit the gym after a healthy dose of fiber-filled food to keep your digestive system active and engaged. Activating your body’s own natural responses will allow you to stay on a normal routine and avoid any bathroom-related issues.

Recap:
All you really have to do to this Passover to avoid the dreaded back-up of your digestive system is to engage in a healthy, active, water and fiber-filled diet. I’d say that’s a little easier than being exiled to wander the desert for forty years. But everyone’s got different struggles, right?

More good stuff here:

  • 12 ways to eat cookie butter
  • Ultimate Chipotle menu hacks
  • Copycat Chick-Fil-A sandwich recipe
  • The easiest 2 ingredient drink recipes, ever
  • 24 must-visit Chicago restaurants from Diners, Drive-ins and Dives

View the original post, How to Keep Your Digestive System on Track this Passover, on Spoon University.

Check out more good stuff from Spoon University here:

  • 12 ways to eat cookie butter
  • Ultimate Chipotle menu hacks
  • Copycat Chick-Fil-A sandwich recipe
  • The easiest 2 ingredient drink recipes, ever
  • 24 must-visit Chicago restaurants from Diners, Drive-ins and Dives

How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


How to Improve Your Digestive Track Naturally

It’s normal to experience digestive issues from time to time. Heartburn, gas, constipation and diarrhea might happen occasionally, but when they start to happen frequently, it can really disrupt your life.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Fortunately, changes to your diet and nutrition can make a big difference when it comes to managing digestive issues. Plus, many of the changes are natural swaps or new considerations – all coming down to the basis of eating real food.

Gastroenterologist Christine Lee, MD, shares six tips to improve your digestion naturally.

  1. Eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Be adventurous and get creative when it comes to adding more fruits and veggies to your diet. Fill your plate with the colors of the rainbow, from red to dark green. Stock up on canned and frozen veggies for convenience, but also be sure to include lots of fresh produce into your meals. Plant foods are rich in fiber and contain many disease fighting chemicals. A high-fiber diet has been linked to improved digestive health.
  2. Choose whole grains more often. Look for and choose packages that say “whole grains” more often than white or processed bread or other grains. It should be on the package, but also in the ingredient list (on the nutrition label). Make sure that the words “whole grains” appear among the first items listed. Then also check the amount of fiber the product contains. Try to choose items with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving for the best benefit.
  3. Limit the amount of beef, pork, lamb and processed meats you eat. Choose poultry or fish more frequently than red meat and limit all processed meats, like salami, bacon and hotdogs. Smaller portions of meat, consumed less often (a 12-ounce porterhouse is really three servings, not one), are also beneficial. Most people don’t need to consume more than 6 to 8 ounces of meat every day. Try replacing meat with dried beans for more fiber. One half cup of beans provides the same amount of protein as in 1 ounce of meat.
  4. Try healthier cooking options. Opt for steaming, poaching, stewing, microwaving, braising and boiling over grilling and frying. And don’t forget – it’s important to make sure your meat gets cooked thoroughly before eating it to reduce other health risks, such as salmonella.
  5. Consume foods with probiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that help fight off the bad bacteria in your gut. They also produce healthy substances that provide nourishment for your gut. Good sources of probiotics include fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchee, raw apple cider vinegar, onion, garlic and sauerkraut.
  6. Limit foods that have added sugars and animal fats. These foods can produce harmful chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract and cause damage over time. Read ingredient labels for sources of added sugars – they can be tricky! Choose lean meats and poultry without skin. Limit high-fat dairy products such as cheese and butter.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy



Comments:

  1. Brunelle

    Ideal variant

  2. Heammawihio

    This is a valuable answer

  3. Amaethon

    A female Windows 98 has been developed. A third has been added to the “yes” and “no” buttons: “maybe”.

  4. Zurr

    Thanks for your help in this matter, I would also like something you can help?

  5. Chagai

    In my opinion, you are wrong. I'm sure. I can prove it. Email me at PM.



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